Tuesday, July 11, 2006

Impression of Socrates

Socrates searches for the truth and is curious about the nature of man. He wants to understand how different men live and think. The questions he asks and how he interprets responses are very intuitive. He seeme wise and in search of more wisdom. Socrates' use of ethos, logos, and pathos are all connected. He uses all three strategies of persuasion to entice and persuade the reader.
"There is nothing which for my part I like better, Cephalus, than conversing with aged men; for I regard them as travelers who have gone a journey which I too may have to go, and of whom I ought to enquire, whether the way is smooth and easy, or rugged and difficult." This passage makes the reader believe Socrates puts much faith in "aged men" because they are wise and have experience. He implies that he gets much of his information from his elders and therefore he establishes ethos for himself, because the reader believes Socrates' conclusions are from wise men who have had many different experiences in life. The reader thinks Socrates is well informed and knowledgeable on the subjects.
"I listened in admiration, and wanting to draw him out, that he might go on-Yes, Cephalus, I said, buth rather that people in general are not convinced by you when you speak thus; they think that old age sits lightly upon you, not because of your happy disposition, but because you are rich, and wealth is well known to be a great comforter." Socrates usues logos in this passage. It is logical to believe that wealth would comfort one in their old age, so Socrates questions if Cephalus' happiness has to do with his wealth. Readers would assume that it could, so Socrates asks this very logical question.
"For he thinks that a friend ought to do good to a friend and never evil." Socrates uses this passage to play on the readers' emotions. Everyone wants their friends to be good to them and never do things to hurt them. This reinforces the need man has for friends and for the trust between friends. This passage makes the reader fell comforted to know that Socrates also believes this. Because Socrates has successfully used ethos and logos, his pathos is even more effective.

1 Comments:

Blogger Ami Herrera said...

I definitely agree that Socrates comes off as very wise, and I think the example you used is perfect in demonstrating this. Your quote "There is nothing which for my part I like better, Cephalus, than conversing with aged men; for I regard them as travelers who have gone a journey which I too may have to go, and of whom I ought to enquire, whether the way is smooth and easy, or rugged and difficult." shows a type of wiseness different from what most people think of as wise. It shows that Socrates is wise in that he constantly wants to learn and knows that he can learn through others opinions and experiences. I think it is important to understand that being wise is not only having lots of knowledge but also requires understand that you do not know everything but can learn from everything that happens in your life.

12:10 AM  

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